Cocaine Addiction Stories

Cocaine Addiction Stories



Cocaine Addiction Stories: That Is Not Me

By Ned Wicker

A number of years ago I met a man who shared his story about a long battle with cocaine addiction. He talked about his criminal record, how he hustled on the streets, scalped tickets to rock concerts, stole meat from a wholesale distributor for illegal resale, and did just about anything else to support his habit. The one question that kept going through my mind as he lamented about his decisions was simply, “How could things have gotten so crazy?”

He was an interesting guy and very likable. He was intelligent, enterprising and had amazing problem-solving ability, only everything he did in life had an angle. He never took a straight line to anything. If there wasn’t an element of larceny in the activity, he wasn’t interested. If he could earn $100 a day by working at his job in construction, he’d use some of that money to fund an illegal activity and make $1000. Nothing was ever enough and he got no satisfaction over just having enough.

After his first stretch of prison time, he proclaimed that he had found Christian faith, but his actions quickly spoke much louder than his words. As charming as he was, you knew not to believe anything he said. The church was his main interest, but he was always in the middle of a “situation” and people felt uncomfortable with him being around, only they couldn’t exactly explain why.

He was involved in a men’s group at his church and seemed to be doing well, when he found himself in a bar one night having a conversation with a drug dealer. It didn’t take long. He bought some coke and the bizarre behavior began. He was eventually picked up by the police, who reported that he was crawling on the street, stark naked and was in a very agitated state. He resisted their attempts to help him and it took two officers to get him into the back of the squad car. That led to another stretch in jail.

He had this habit of always confessing his actions to the men’s group. From prison he’d write these long, flowery letters, filled with religious jargon, gushing with platitudes. Nobody believed any of it. It was a phony smoke screen, designed to appeal to “religious” people, but everyone saw through it. He could never bring himself to be real.

The guys in the group were interested in being his friend and worked hard at being real with each other. But he was always working the angle. It’s one thing to “find Jesus” in prison, but it is quite another to walk with Jesus on the outside. He never understood that.

He was from time to time more open. In talking about his craving for cocaine, he was especially honest and sincere, hiding nothing. He talked of having no control over these cravings and how he had to fight just to keep from running downtown to score.

Once the onion was peeled away, he shared that his life was a constant inner battle; that he wanted to be clean and sober, but the madness of the cocaine addiction made that so very difficult. He said he didn’t know what to do because he craved the coke but at the same time, he didn’t want to use any more. It was a spiritual and psychological tug-of-war.

He tried to do the right thing and avoid the drugs, but invariably he’d be in a situation and one thing led to another. It was always somebody else’s fault though. That’s another aspect of his life. Even when he was being “honest,” he was looking for a way out, a way to lay the blame on someone else, or deflect the responsibility.

He had been through a couple of 12 Step programs in prison, and of course had been through treatment a couple of times, but he told me that it didn’t work for him. He also understood that guys “fake it to make it” in prison, knowing that if you get through the 12 Step program you may get out earlier or you may enjoy some other benefit. To skate through the 12 Step is a complete waste of time, as there is no benefit for those who do not embrace the process and truly want to work at it.

He was not interested in pursuing any meaningful self-examination, because he understood that he wouldn’t like what he saw. He had been there before and chose to look the other way. It was much easier to step away and proclaim that the program didn’t work.

If an issue is not dealt with it will not go away. Over the years I have seen him from time-to-time and the story is the same one that he has told for the last 20 years. He’s always working an angle. He always struggles with the same issues. His life is crazy and he doesn’t understand how it got this way. His life doesn’t change. There’s no reason for it to change.

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Cocaine Addiction Stories are Important

In meeting and working with addiction recovery patients over the years I have found that one of the most important aspects of their recovery is having the opportunity to share their story, their life experience. Cocaine addiction stories don't often have a happy ending but what ever the ending sharing them is helpful.

A former teacher of mine is a psychotherapist, who always talked to us about getting to the "essence of self" when helping people tell those all important Cocaine addiction stories. It is the essence of self that drives the person's perceptions and creates meaning in life. Your Cocaine addiction stories are important. You are not alone and maybe there is someone who will benefit from you sharing your experience. We encourage you to gather your thoughts and share them with us.

A few Cocaine addiction stories

Here are a couple of Cocaine addiction stories that describe the process of recovery. We’re hoping that you will share your stories with us as well so that others can learn from your experiences.

Many people tell us that it helps them to read others Cocaine addition stories because they understand what they've gone through a little better. Many times therapy sessions are simply a place where people come and share their Cocaine addiction stories.

You may find that sharing your Cocaine addiction story anonymously is the first step toward dealing with addiction.

Not a Great Night to be an Atheist

Josh Hamilton had a dream that he would be in Yankee Stadium in a Home Run Derby contest. The 27 year-old slugger from the Texas Rangers had his dream come true July 14, and he put on the greatest display of power and consistency in the history of the event. It wasn’t long ago that Hamilton wasn’t a professional baseball player at all. He was a cocaine and heroin addict. Click Cocaine addiction articles here...

Easy Access

“Kevin” was a registered nurse and participating in a short-term out-patient recovery program. Unlike many people who come into rehab, Kevin knew he had ... Click here to read more...

Not a Great Night to be an Atheist

Josh Hamilton had a dream that he would be in Yankee Stadium in a Home Run Derby contest. The 27 year-old slugger from the Texas Rangers had his dream come true July 14, and he put on the greatest display of power and consistency in the history of the event. It wasn’t long ago that Hamilton wasn’t a professional baseball player at all. He was a cocaine and heroin addict. Click Cocaine addiction articles here...

Popping Pills

“Judy” was participating in a long-term residential Cocaine treatment program, and was three months into a six-month scheduled stay. He had sustained an injury ... Click here to read more...

The most unworthy of these

The nurses were all talking about the two brothers. It’s was at the daily morning meeting, when the interdisciplinary team gathered to discuss the status of each patient in the hospital. The nurses were exchanging notes on each patient and when the two brothers came up for review, the entire mood of the meeting changed. Click here to read more...

Who knew this would happen?

This is a story about a beautiful, bright and intelligent girl. She was the best player on her eighth grade basketball team and she appeared to have all of the requisite talent to excel in high school and perhaps earn an athletic scholarship. But she never went out for the high school team. “Too much time commitment” was her reasoning and she never played again... Click here to read more...

God bless the “bad guy”

When it comes to delivering a message, or taking even the most appropriate and necessary action, nobody really likes to be the “bad guy.” In the case of addiction, the “bad guy” is the one who takes action and intercedes on behalf of a friend or loved one. God bless the “bad guy,” who sees a problem, tries to help, and in so many cases may wind up saving a life... Click here to read more...

Accidental, but not uncommon

Actor Brad Renfro’s fatal overdose is a sad reminder that heroin use can lead to devastating consequences. It’s an even sadder reminder that no matter how much money and resources are pumped into Cocaine education programs, the message still doesn’t get out. It’s not like this is a new phenomenon. Click here to read more...

Busted and Going Downward

It was one of those sad stories that made no sense to me at the time. I was a young man, serving in the Navy overseas at the Naval Communications Station-Philippines. As the story goes, he got involved with a Filipino girl and failed to show up for duty for several days...Click here to read more...



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ABOUT…

SYMPTOMS…

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The rest of the pages are there for your reference to explain important topics in more detail.

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