Addiction Effects

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Addiction Effects

Potential Stolen Away

There was every reason to believe that Bob was going to do well in life. He had a creative intelligence and an organized approach to his profession that enabled him to put together teams of people for his projects, and those projects were clearly high quality.

He had been valedictorian of his university class, and while others were dreaming of their “dream” job, Bob was already sailing along.

As successful as he was, there was something smoldering under the surface and soon Bob’s life began to unravel and the effects of addiction began to appear. When he was in college, his reputation for academic and professional excellence was topped only by his love for drinking and smoking pot.

If there was a party, there was Bob. Once out of college and with his dream job already realized, his social life changed. It’s like he never moved on. People get out of school, get a job, maybe settle down and get married, but Bob did not go that way. He did his job by day, then after work, it was like he was back in his college days, the effects of addiction took over.

The excessive use of alcohol and marijuana continued, but he began using other illegal substances; the effects of addiction worsened. His job was not affected at first, and a couple of years after college, Bob got married. It didn’t last long. She got the house, all of the furnishings and support payments after the divorce. Bob had a nervous breakdown.

His life came apart. Once the “golden boy” of his class, Bob soon found himself unemployed. He talked about the politics in his profession, how there weren’t any good jobs out there, and always talked about the “good old days.” Bob had a close relationship with his parents, but both died within two years of each other. He had a brother, but after the death of his parents, they drifted apart. They were not close to begin with. His drug and alcohol use became the center of his life.

He received medication for depression, but never received treatment for his addiction. He would wash down his medication with alcohol. He was in complete denial. When asked how he was, his stock answer was always, “I’m going great.” When a friend would express concern for him, Bob would always answer “I’m fine, why are you asking me this?”

His behavior became bizarre, the effects of addiction began to overwhelm him, he would get on his cell phone and call friends around the country late at night from the local tavern. He would plan lavish projects and try to pull everybody he knew into the plan. There was never any rhythm or reason to the plans, which were devised out of a drug-induced haze.

He would never find work in his profession again, but did find employment working on a loading dock. As he aged, he struggled and could not keep up with younger workers. He was injured one afternoon while toting a heavy bag and could not work again. He went on disability. He rationalized his situation by saying,

“This is the best time of my life. I can do what I want now.”

He lost his house, his car and was left with very little, but still denied the effects of addiction. He lived alone, isolated from his old friends, without any new friends. His friends all encouraged him to seek treatment, but he was fine, nothing wrong. There was no family to look after him.

Even with an abundance of friends and family to support the addict, their denial of the situation can prevent treatment. When someone is lone and isolated, there is little that can be done to help. Bob’s story is repeated so many times, every day, in every city and state.

Addiction robs people of their potential, their successes and their humanity. What might have been, what should have been, all too often has been swallowed, leaving only a crushed spirit behind.

For more Addiction Effects link to Intervention

Detox from alcohol: Is there a medicine one can take to alleviate the cravings?

by Brad
(Houston, TX)

I've been an active alcoholic for about 40 years now. I've detoxed a few times in jail and a couple of times at self-will.

I'm going to give this another go - I've been sober for the last 48 hours. No cravings as YET! I have decided this because alcohol is really draining me physically as I am now into my 50's. I normally drink about 1/5 of a half gallon of hard liquor and pretty much every day after work.

Detox from alcohol: Is there a medicine one can take to alleviate the cravings?
by: Fairfield Don

At your age, the amount of alcohol you are consuming is out of bounds. A doctor may want you to take Antabuse. It is a pill you take everyday.

As long as you take the pill, you will get VERY sick if you consume alcohol. However if you quit taking the pill for a couple of weeks, you can drink all you want.

I am a lot older than you, (70), and I took the pill. I slipped and regretted it. I have not drank for over 10 months, only because I was willing to go to any length to stay sober.

No pills, just faith in AA and God. Yes I am a Christian, but don't let that fool you. Get to rehab and then go to AA, and do what they suggest. You will work your way up to God. By the way, AA doesn't require anything from you. Just that you want to stay sober. Wow, what a demand. You don't have to sign anything, no obligation period.

Good luck and may God bless you.

Medical Issue
by: Ned Wicker

I do not mean to cop out on your question, but I want to encourage you to see your doctor and get a physical examination.

I am not a doctor, but I do know there are medicines that can help you. The reason for the check-up is to see if the alcoholism has created any other problems.

Alcohol is extremely toxic and so it can effect your organs and be the cause of problems you might not be feeling yet.

I also want to encourage you to go to AA and allow other alcoholics to support you as you fight for sobriety. They have been down that path. They understand. They care.



and Finally Remember:

"Ask and it will be given to you; seek and you will find; knock and the door will be opened to you. For everyone who asks receives; he who seeks finds; and to him who knocks, the door will be opened."
- Matthew 7:7-8






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