Why Do I Feel High

by Brittney
(United States)

I’ve smoked weed everyday and I’m usually high throughout the day, but I’ve been trying to quit. I haven’t smoked in three days yet I felt high for a few hours today.

Why do I feel high even though the marijuana should be completely out of my body by now?

Comments for Why do I feel high, if I haven’t smoked recently?

Pot can have as many as 400 different drugs in it.
by: Debbie WickerDear “Confused need help understanding”,Each of us is different and have unique brain chemistry. Because pot has up to 400 different drugs in it, we each react differently to it’s effects. Also, pot is commonly laced with other drugs, which also may be effecting you.I HIGHLY recommend that you see a doctor, preferably a psychiatrist so they can assess what is happening with you. Working with a doctor and having a complete medical check up should rule out any medical issues that you’re having and help you get correct treatment for anything they discover.Gook luck,DebbieDebbie

I’m confused need help understanding
by: AnonymousIt’s been 6-7 months of being sober (from weed) and I’m still bouncing in and out of reality. It’s kinda scary sometimes and I’ve talked to my parents about it and they said that they would take me to a doctor, but we never got around to it. So I went to my guidance counselor and she had no idea either, so we googled it. We still can’t figure it out, there’s nothing on the internet that useful. If anyone has actual info please let me know I’d be very thankful I might also just call idk yet?

Whoever says weed aint got withdrawel haven’t got a clue!
by: AnonymousI’ve been a heavy skunk user for over 15 years, smoking 6 joints a day making 3 joints out of a 20 bag so I’d class myself a heavy user. I’ve stopped smoking for almost 4 days now.Whoever says you don’t get withdrawal, they clearly haven’t got a clue what they’re talking on about. I’m living it and going through it as we speak. Anything i eat i want to throw up. Shaking in my arms and hands. Mood swings, one min being on top of the world, the next being drained like a zombie. Sweating so much at nights i have to change me sheets twice. Can’t get to sleep whatsoever so I’m having to take natural sleeping remedies. Loss of all appetite and sweets. I look as pale as a sheep. I have very bad anxiety. I never had any of these issues while smoking skunk.So please, if this isn’t withdrawal symptoms then in lighten me to what it could be. You should only post if you have a clue what your talking about. If not, then leave it to the people that are living it.

I’m not the only one
by: AaronI’ve only been smoking for like 4 years and I’m 19 now, I only started smoking a lot for the past 3 months! Like I’d wake up to a fat L-J sitting next to me in the mornings would smoke another before work and hit up the eye drops to hide the heck that I’m melted. I think i was contiously addicted to it, I just loved being in that state where I’m high. Until I realised I got anxiety from it.I realised I had anxiety was when I went away on a 6 day holiday with my friends and didn’t touch a bit of weed during those times and I ended up getting acid reflux from drinking far to much and eating. Every time my heart went I started getting more and more scared each time and I had a panic attack once cause I couldn’t handle thinking that I was getting a heart attack which I wasn’t!!I swear if you knew me before you’d know I wouldn’t care about anything, I was super laid back until the holiday.When I got back home I smoked a j and the same thing happened and I ended going into the hospital and told them everything that happened on holiday and I was told that weed shouldn’t effect acid reflux. They said that I had been so accustomed to weed and missing it for even 6 days my body was getting withdrawal from it. Then, with the anxiety finally kicking in as well I shocked my body and my mind wasn’t prepared for it.After that I literally had to teach myself how to smoke weed without freaking out. But now that I’ve stopped for 2 weeks it still feels like I’m high or hazey and just not focused. But I found something that might have a connection to people why they continue to be hazey or high even when they don’t smoke and it’s called “DEPERSONALISATION” and what it is is that you feel like you’re just watching yourself do things day to day and it could feel like you’re kinda high but check it out.Depersonalisation usually has a connection with anxiety or even depression but usually is caused by trauma but it doesn’t need have to be trauma. People can get depersonalisation even if you’re a non weed smoker. And if weed has a connection to anxiety then that has a link to depersonalisation,I’m trying find solutions to this feeling cause and I hope this helps and all the best to those who feels like their head is bad after stopping. Good luck lads.

I’m just blowed
by: AnonymousIt’s okay people. Just toke up or choke up or something like that. 🤷🏽‍♀️

Each of us unique
by: Debbie WickerIt shouldn’t surprise us that each of us withdraws from marijuana uniquely. From recent research, we’re finding that marijuana has at least 400 different drugs within it. Therefore, each of will respond to those drugs differently based on our different brain chemistry.Hopefully, your negative symptoms will reduce over time and eventually the brain chemistry will revert back to how it was before any marijuana use. But the younger we are when we begin to use, may make it more difficult for that transition to happen quickly. We just don’t have enough research or information to know the answer.Hang in there and hopefully, as time goes by, you’ll be completely back to normal, but give it some time.Debbie

Same
by: AnonymousHey man, I’m going through the same thing but it’s been like 5 months since I quit and I still feel high?

You gotta want truly want it.
by: AnonymousHi all, started smoking weed aged 17. Had a major stroke at 30 (drs blamed it on weed). Began smoking weed again 3 months later when allowed home. Because it i was forced to stop, and didn’t really want to.I am now 50 years old and have been weed free for 4 weeks. i still feel stoned sometimes, have headaches, and sleeping problems and my husband says i am a grump to my family, (it’s because i won’t let everything simply wash over me anymore).But on the plus side, i have much more energy and the will to do stuff, people have complemented how i look better and my slurry speech has improved. I feel like i have another chance at experiencing life.The mind is sooo powerful. Maybe there are no physical withdrawals, but if you believe that you’re going to have a hard time giving up you probably will. Good luck to all who embark upon this…..once you have done it for a few weeks you will never look back, but only if its your decision to stop in the first place.

Oh boy, oh boy!
by: AlexFunny you guys are trying to get clean. I’m having fun out here getting baked out of my mind. Bro I got acid and weed and shrooms man I never wanna leave this shuff behind. These are the best times of my life. Y’all are stupid.

Each of us is unique and experience marijuana withdrawal differently.
by: Debbie WickerDear gurrrrl,It is going to take some time for you to begin to feel better. You’ve smoked a lot of weed so it’s likely to be at least a month or two before you will not longer feel the effects as severely.When we smoke weed, it changes our brain chemistry so that we adapt to smoking it. When we quit our brain chemistry has to re-adjust and that’s where your withdrawal symptoms are coming from. Usually, your brain is able to re-adjust on it’s own and over time you will begin to feel like yourself again.Because you started using before you’re brain was fully developed, some effects on IQ and motivation many be irreversible. That is at least what recent research on marijuana use is showing.Just continue not to use weed to allow your brain to re-adjust back to the way it was without marijuana in your system.Debbie

THC
by: AnonymousThe thc of the weed is a lot stronger then what it used to be and haze is a lot stronger than blues.There should be more help with weed!

gurrrrl
by: AnonymousWeed is highly addictive, I smoked about 30/40 dollars worth a day at a young age to try it, then i started using everyday for about seven years when i spending any money i had on it. I thought i have to stop now.I am on my seventh day today and i have had headaches i have constantly sweating, been hot and cold, major anxiety feelings in my stomach(feeling worried).I also have a family member that smokes it and it’s ruined his life. He doesn’t want to work or even leave the house, he has been sacked from various jobs and has no motivation because that is what it makes you feel.Recently i have been feeling like i have smoked a joint and i haven’t i just wondered does anyone know when i will be fully clear and feel better again?

2 weeks sober almost
by: AnonymousRecently I have had a very minor mouth surgery so I decided to quit smoking weed. I have never smoked a cigarette or consumed any illegal drug(besides weed in my state) mid 20’s I have been a regular smoker for a little over a year 5-7 times per week.Typically, only at night I would smoke. I have had 1 joint in the last 2 weeks and when I smoked it I passed out and hit the ground face first. I would contribute this from drinking 3 beers, being out in the sun sweating, and grilling.About 10 minutes after smoking is when I passed out. Weed has effected my daily life minimally. It did make me a little lazy the next day and slow moving and on occasion I would catch a bad vib and have little panic attacks.Reality has set in after my collapse. I’m basically 2 weeks in I still feel kind of high. My vision is hazy and I’m still a little slow. I wake up soaking wet with sweat at night, I’m having crazy dreams, I feel lazy, very tired, weak, and shaky.I had no idea weed had withdrawal symptoms. So I thought I had some kind of sickness like the flu or mono. Then when I read about it I saw it was normal. I don’t believe I was addicted what so ever, I loved smoking it tho.It hasn’t been hard to quit at all. I sit on the couch in the evening and I think to myself I would like to have a few hits but it no problem for me not to do it. I have papers and a stock pile of weed too. I even pass up hits with friends.I can’t wait for this haze to go away, I will never be a regular user again. Once this withdrawal feeling goes away I wouldn’t care to hit a joint with a few friends every now and then.

Don’t use stupid blog to diagnose yourself
by: Mason The withdrawerYou can feel high even if you didn’t smoke. Don’t self diagnose using this stupid blog. Go see a doctorYou can have withdrawal pains in the body. Once again go to the doctor.

Britney, I belive it is dehydration.
by: AnonymousI haven’t smoked in years and i must say today i am experiencing that high sensation for the last few hours. I have been living with Ms for over twenty years and occasionally stress, dehydration and the lack of sleep triggers this for me…it is really about understanding your body… smoking may or may not help relieve your stress and help you sleep… Whatever works for you.

A different view on your physical ailments
by: AnonymousWould it not be safe to say that you could possibly just have a high blood pressure without smoking? Smoking marijuana does indeed lower your blood pressure, which is one of the ways that it can be used medically. Same idea can be used for insomnia and physical pains.Seeing as this drug can be used to cure insomnia and minor physical pains, I do not see why you would not have a “physical withdrawal” when you decided to quit. You say you are heavy smokers and pride yourself in smoking since you were a young age, but you do not put into perspective that life has been continuing since you were 11 (or whatever age).I bet every person in the world has gained some sort of chronic pain or a disorder since they were 11 if they are currently 25+. I bet a survey of 100 people of your same gender will have the same results or similar and they haven’t smoked a day in their life.Although you have the experience as a marijuana smoker, please refrain from drawing conclusions that can easily be discredited by using common sense. You are not the control of the experiment.

A lot of misinformation
by: AnonymousHello,12 year, heavy smoker, on a everyday basis here clean for a few days.Withdrawal effects are 100% physchological and do NOT have any physical withdrawal symptoms.Interpret this as you like, but if you’re thinking you’re going to have a physical symptom from withdrawal, chances are it’s going to happen.Been a health nut for the past three years, great physical condition. I also consider myself somewhat intelligent and read very often. The worst symptoms I’ve faced from being clean a few days is a reduction in my patience, I still am craving a toke somewhat, but by NO means any of the BS posted previously.It is possible as in exercise everybody is different and some may react in a different manner than others when it comes to quitting.Reading the few posts though I felt I had to contribute to the topic. Neck and body pains from stopping? Not likely.Hard to sleep? Exercise and live a healthy lifestyle will fix that.

Headaches? Make sure you’re drinking plenty of water and eating healthy and incorporate exercise into your life.

I’m sure there will be posts downplaying my comments, but I was a HEAVY smoker of high % of THC green, and I’ve not exhibited any major side effects from smoking or quitting.

Stopping smoking is not that hard! As with anything in life if you WANT something bad enough you’ll make it happen.

 


JOKE
by: AnonymousI bonged hit every hour or so, well at least I used to. Don’t tell me you know about withdrawal on weed. IT SUCKS. Please go smoke more than a 1/4 a day for 7 years and try quit cold turkey. I couldn’t sleep, concentrate, talk to people normally without getting massive anxiety.My whole brain chemistry was so out of whack. People who believe withdrawal from weed is non- existent are people who think they are heavy users but actually aren’t and think smoking a a couple joints a day is ”HEAVY” usage. HA, or just plain ignorant and stupid.

Are we here to help or bully one another?
by: Jon DollazI agree with the above poster. Bullying and belittling someone because they have different political views is actually the sign of a low intellect.For the record, Trump, who is personally anti-drug and does not even drink, is pro-legalization, as it should be a states rights issue. Meanwhile, Hillary is owned by the big pharmaceuticals and big banks that profit from the counter productive war on drugs.

Need to smoke now
by: AnonymousWhy do people bring Trump supporters in something that isn’t even closely related. Should I talk about Hillary the should be felon? Should someone be over looked when others have time stripped from their lives and others not because of power and social popularity?This post has nothing to do with the subject I apologize but i mean come on leave the political bs somewhere it belongs!

Stopping pot is hard!
by: AnonymousTo the last writer that is trying to achieve his degree in math thank you very much! I too started smoking at an early age, 13 to be exact. Like you I am 28 and have also been clean and sober for two weeks now.The first week my body was physically hurting. I had aches in my neck and could not turn my head freely without feeling a slight discomfort. Although I am not a medical professional I am a realist and assume this is due to the fact that when I smoked I would hold the smoke in as long as possible in my respiratory system before exhaling. This was my method since the first day I got high so naturally I assumed there would be some negative repercussions on my body.After the end of a long two week clean and sober streak the discomfort in my neck has gone away, however I am noticing it is hard to stay asleep the entire night. I usually will wake up around 1 am without an urge to smoke but finding it impossible to go back to sleep.I too have stopped smoking for the same reason you have. I am pursuing my college degree and decided the only way to give it a fair and honest try was to do so with a clean mind. I smoked almost everyday for the first semester and got through it with good grades but as the material becomes more involved I found it harder to learn and retain information.I have put in place what I think to be a decent daily exercise regimen. I have picked up an old beloved hobby of mind, skateboarding. I skateboard to and from work everyday. My job is also very physical I work at hospital basically as a mover of heavy medical equipment and supplies so I incorporate that into my exercise routine as well.I have been trying to eat better. I no longer buy fast food as routinely as I used to for breakfast and lunch. Instead I will bring something from home for both meals and will cook something basic for dinner. I admit I need to lay off the sugar I get from sodas but quitting all my vices at once I felt would be too much for me to overcome so I am hoping that after a month of sobriety my diet will fall in line.To anyone that may wonder, although I smoked weed almost daily in the form of papers or cigar leaves I never was a huge cigarette smoker. The only times I would buy packs of cigarettes was during my previous attempts of quitting weed. Although I would not get high, i was constantly chasing the nicotine buzz to help alter my mood even if for a minute or two. Although this never really helped and I would usually find myself reverting back to weed after about a week.I’ll close by saying its late and unfortunately I am writing this at 3 am but I am thankful for giving myself more distance from my old behaviors. I go on vacation at the end of August and I admit on one hand I am consumed by a fantasy about buying a bag and just really relaxing. However, on the other hand the hard truth i find dumb to ignore is that this would only set me back and completely derail any progress I made until that point.

To any one struggling I sympathize with you. Marijuana does effect our brain patterns and behaviors especially if you are like myself who would smoke whenever a free moment would present itself throughout any given day. Good luck I hope it gets easier!


Jason is a knob
by: NickDon’t take random people’s advice too seriously, often writers of these comments have the intellect of Donald Trump supporters.
Marijuana is equally addictive as any other mainstream drug commonly consumed by people these days. I can say personally in my history that getting off hard drugs such as cocaine or methamphetamine can be done with less effort than nicotine or marijuana.
For me it was easier to stop as one doesn’t typically wake’n’bake on cocaine, then head to school or work. Marijuana is an all day everyday drug, widely accepted in society. I smoked everyday, in every spare moment since I was 11 yrs old, I am 28 now and off the weed for the first time. Two weeks sober and done for good.I have ache, pains, blood pressure through the roof, can’t sleep, can’t eat, extremely irritable, quick to snap and numerous other symptoms of withdrawal. I still feel perma-fried. I can focus better and have been exercising everyday, but still feel stoned.It is no surprise as my brain and body are hardwired for the weed. When i stopped freebasing cocaine I mourned the loss of that sweet sweet high but moved on fast physically. I had more trouble mentally keeping myself away from accessing it but physically i was ok.Cigarettes i stopped cold turkey and am 6 weeks off the cigs. Much much harder than cocaine. Much much less so than weed. Marijuana is an awesome way to calm down and has too many medical uses to be treated the way it is but honestly that’s what makes it so hard to stop. There are minimal negative effects.I stopped because I couldn’t concentrate in math class as i am trying to better myself and attain my degree in science. Even if i didn’t smoke all day i still couldn’t concentrate enough to understand differential equations or functions and vectors. Math needs a clear mind.Two weeks later of not a puff and I’m rocking 100% on my tests and assignments, still feel baked though. I figure the real issue is strait up in the brain and the way it is wired. I have (high) hopes of staying clean but read this blog as i do many blogs for support and had to chime in.Don’t kid yourself about trying to down play the effects of long term marijuana use. I wish all the great people out there who are tying to quit all the best.

Truth
by: CounsellorThe previous comments are uneducated. As an addict of much harsher drugs turned counsellor, allow me to clarify.Marijuana is NOT physically addictive. It doesn’t change the brain, it may alter perception, which is wholly psychological.Marijuana IS psychologically addictive. This can be said about every substances, action, etc. known to man kind.Marijuana can only affect adolescent brains, permanently. And even then it is only bringing forward underlying issues that were already there.I’m pro-marijuana as well because I know the facts and myths.Marijuana has the potential of being detected up to 3 months after ingestion via the high end urinalysis I’m required to administer to my clients daily. Stop living in the days of no internet and research before spewing garbage and misinformation.

SMH
by: RobClearly, you’ve been a long time daily stoner. There are symptoms of withdrawal from smoking, you obviously aren’t a true stoner. Like any substance or even food, once you stop using or consuming it, you’re body will naturally crave it.I’ve stopped smoking for about two weeks and I still have moments when I feel a little stoned. Also, if you ever actually were a constant stone you’d know that right when you stop you’ll get headaches every once in awhile and it can also be hard to fall asleep.This withdrawal isn’t as serious as other substances but it’s still there. Obviously I’m very pro weed and I also believe it’s safe but you’re just being ignorant.

Quack job
by: JasonDebbie,There is no such thing as withdrawal from weed. Never has happened. Sure, if you run out and want to smoke, u maybe like “this sucks I want to get baked” but you won’t be on the floor on the fetal position in pain. Not gonna happen. I take it up you have never smoked Mary Jane before? And yeah it takes 30 days or so to completely come out of the system but you not going to feel high for days on end. A few hours at best and then it ends. That’s why it’s a safe drug. No one has ever overdosed and died and if you smoke too much than u only need to wait a little bit till u come down.

Withdrawal takes a while because the marijuana is still in your system.
by: Debbie WickerDear Brittney,Because it has been only three days, you can assume that the marijuana is still in your system.According to Marijuana Anonymous: “Unlike most other drugs, including alcohol, THC (the active chemical in marijuana) is stored in the fat cells and therefore takes longer to fully clear the body than with any other common drug. This means that some parts of the body still retain THC even after a couple of months, rather than just the couple of days or weeks for water soluble drugs.”It is recommended that you increase you exercise and water intake to avoid dehydration allowing your body to get rid of the marijuana as quickly as possible.Just like with alcohol, once your body becomes used to being high everyday it may naturally go into that state even if you do not smoke. If you’re able to go a month without smoking then these effects should subside. But if you relapse even once, you will have to go through full withdrawal all over again.Marijuana attacks the brain and changes it, so that once you’re addicted to it, any amount of pot will change the brain back to the way it was when you where using every day.Hope that helps and good luck with your sobriety, taking it one day at a time if often you best approach.Debbie

Yaba problem


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Yaba problem

by Raisa

(Dhaka, Bangladesh)

My friend takes yaba once in 3 or 4 days, but he says he is not addicted he takes it to lose weight and keep his body fit.

But I feel this thing will soon make him addicted, but he says he has a good mind control and he won’t be addicted. What should I do to convince him stop taking these? Or does he already need the medical help?

Comments for Yaba problem

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None of us think we will get addicted!


by: Debbie Wicker


Dear Raisa,

We all think that we can use drugs every day or two and not become addicted. That’s almost always NOT TRUE! Your friend is likely already addicted but doesn’t now it.

Addiction has nothing to do with “good mind control”. If someone is using regularly, then there is a reason they are using. That reason will likely lead them to addiction. I’ve had people tell me that they use because it helps them get through a stressful day, or it calms them down so they can rest. Many use Yaba/Meth because it allows them to work and get so much done.

Here is a story we just received from a meth (yaba) user is the USA:

NEVER AGAIN Three days later, I lost my job. Almost lost a home. If it wasn’t for him, I would’ve been all alone. In such short time, I nearly lost everything. I thought man I’m so blessed to see the reality and how fast you could lose all the most important things, and overcome it and move away and start over so easily.

NEVER AGAIN Three months sober. And a relationship that was now over. I was home and on my own. What did I have to lose? One more time won’t hurt, I just want something to do. It was just like the first time. I fell right back in love, but the love turned to torture, everyday for weeks. I had to have it. I even sold my things.

He came back just in time to save me, or so I thought. He believed all my lies and I ever tricked him to help me buy. Turns out I had some to lose, my health and my mind. Please save me. No never mind. I’ll be fine. I’m moving away again to get clean.

NEVER AGAIN I moved back home with my family. I was happy and doing what I loved. Everything was perfect. I had been doing so good. I needed a break, just this once, I deserve some fun. I got so lost.

For hours it didn’t end. I thought I was dead. God please help me I cried. Calm down, your being dramatic, your just really high. You think it’s the devil? No it’s just in your mind. Sober up go to work. I think I’ll get Baptized.

NEVER AGAIN God saved me, I want my friends to know. My new knowledge and how great it was to feel loved and saved and never alone. My past, my burdens, my hate, the pain and the tears.

NEVER AGAIN “Your not strong enough” oh yes I am. To go back home, and do it alone. Two days later i think about how everyday I sin, if all sins are equal, why can’t I do it again? Just one more time, this is it then I’m done. It was just suppose to be a weekend thing, you know, for fun. A week later and I still haven’t slept. I lost my job again, and my family wept. They are done they can’t help me no more. I was out of chances.

NEVER AGAIN I have to make it up. I have to show them, that I don’t have a problem. I’m just being young. I gained a new family. I loved them so much. But the craving came back, and I wanted it so bad. Whatever it took I was getting it. I cursed them out, I spit in their face, but I didn’t care. I was getting high today. I hated them, I was done, I don’t want help.

NEVER AGAIN There were two people left. I called them my friends. They wanted to help, but just didn’t understand. I’ve moved 7 times this month. I lost my job. I have no one left and I feel all alone. My head is starting to feel strange. But I was learning new things. Am I losing myself? Or is this the real me? I’m comfortable and confident I love the new me. It opened my mind and now I couldn’t be better, with a new job on the way.

NEVER AGAIN I actually didn’t get fired. Just walked out on my job. After just one day, I thought screw it I’m done. The only friends I had left was the ones that help numb my pain. But really it just made it worse. They tortured me and fed me lies and revealed more pain, I was just angry all the time. I had no more money and nothing to sell. Just for one line, I gave myself. I felt so disgusting. Had so much shame. Cried for hours. This is it. I’ve gone too far.

NEVER AGAIN What are you doing? You are not a whore? Your better than this life. Don’t you remember before? Remember your love for sobriety and doing this right? 18 years you’ve had it rough. No childhood or stability. Your mom and dad were gone. But it wasn’t your fault. You had no control, they chose the high? Remember you always wanted that little girl? Your doing wrong. Don’t you know your now in control? No one can hurt you, but you.

Your choosing the high. Why did you give up on your dreams? I don’t want this no more. But it feels to me, that it’s getting harder and harder to remember the real me. I’m so disrespectful and don’t care. My good memories are fading. It hasn’t even been a year. I can see what’s happening. I know I still have control, I have to stop now or I will lose and go down the wrong road.

NEVER AGAIN. I say it every time, but when will it be true? Will it ever be? Before I completely lose my mind.

Lord I Need You…

###

She thought she could control of her use but she didn’t. Yes, your friend need medical support and he/she also needs to stop NOW, that’s how mind control can be demonstrated.

Good luck,

Debbie


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You have to go through the worst before you get to the best.


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You have to go through the worst before you get to the best.

by Felicia

( Indiana)

me today, sober<3" title="me today, sober <3">

me today, sober <3

I was 13 years old when I first started smoking pot. Of course I liked it, who wouldn't? I would smoke daily, it would make me feel happy, care free, I would laugh constantly and that was great I loved it.

When i was 15 years old I snorted my first pill because my friends told me "Just do it! It will hit you faster and it feels great, there is nothing wrong with doing it." So I did. I snorted my first pill.

When it hit me damn the feeling was amazing, nothing could compare to do. I snorted pills day after day after day. It was easy to hide because my father didn't care when I left to go to my friends house. She had easy access to drugs so we were always do whatever we could do to get weed, pills, or alcohol.

That isn't when it got to its worse. When summer started I was hanging out with a different friend, she woulld get Xanax bars, kpins. We'd take that shit and get straight fadded. I didn't know what I was doing? I didn't care what would happen, life wasn't the best so I said f it.

Everyday we were taking pills and hanging out with many people. All day everyday we would be taking pills, feelings numb was the greatest thing I have ever felt in my life. It was amazing. Not having any worries, not caring, not thinking, not wondering, not being sober enough to text people talk to talk to anyone but the people around me.

Not talking to anyone for days and it being okay because they didn't wonder where you were at or how you were doing because they had their own life to worry about, even though that is sad because that's my family not caring.

After the beginning of the summer I slowed down on the pills because they were harder to get and I wasn't hanging out with the same people anymore. Then I was usually just smoking pot. It is hard to exactly remember how things went so I will try my best to explain. I stopped doing pills as much and I just usually smoked weed.

Then things got harder so I was always asking people for pills. Any kind, and then by myself or with people I would crush it up and snort it down. It started again doing it all the time. I wouldn't just do a little at a time either, I did a lot, pill after pill after pill I took or snorted.

I was like a zombie, not showing feelings, not talking to anyone, not being happy, nothing. I was a zombie. I did not care what people thought either. Drugs are all i cared about. I was losing myself, guys used me all the time and I didn't see it. It happened a lot.

I was losing friends, the ones that meant the most to me. Like I said though I didn't care what happened or who I lost. There was a counselor at my school. She knew everything that I was going through and what I was doing. She knew all the drugs I did and who I liked and what was going on. She was telling me what needed to happen and how I was destroying myself.

I stopped doing pills, but then I started hanging out with the wrong crowd again and then started taking pills again, I got so fed up I didn't know what was going on.

People told my father I was saying "my dad don't care about me, he doesn't love me." I do not remember saying that.. I blacked out. What else could I of done? I don't know because I was too fed up to know what I was doing!

I stopped again after that, because my friends were going to leave me if I did drugs again. Not even a week later I did pills again.. I thought all the times I stopped doing pills I could do it by myself but I really couldn't, it was to hard for me. My mind craved the pills, that is all I thought about.

The last time that I took pills I realized that I could not do it by myself. So I told my counselor that I needed help because I could not do it by myself. Then I told my parents that I needed help because I am addicted to pills. They all said that they will do whatever they can to help me get sober.

My choices were I could get sent to rehab for few weeks to get treatment, or me and a few other people from my school can work through addiction together and fight the urge. If that doesn't work though I am going to go to rehab.

The people that I would do drugs with I stayed away from because I knew I could not say no to drugs if they had them. That made them mad because I would not hang out with them. So I almost lost one of my friends, and then I just lost another because I did not want to go to her house because I know there is always drugs there.

Now here i am, it is hard very very hard. I always get headaches and I always have the want of pills. Every time i start thinking about pills I text either my counselor or some of my friends that are helping me through my addiction and they get my mind off of it. It has been so worth it because I feel like such a better person, I am always laughing and I am always happy.

I have not been sober for very long don't get me wrong. But I plan on staying sober. I love the feeling of "being high on life" I get those random moments where I can't stop laughing or I get so damn hyper for no reason at all. It made me happy because I knew I am being like this totally sober and its just because life is so good.

I can be my complete self around everyone, not having to hide anything from my family or friends feels so good.

I don't have to lie anymore. I can be happy and totally content with my life. So I told you all of this because I want you to know, being off drugs is a blessing, it is the best thing that I could ever ask for. You do not need drugs, there are people who will always be there for you and help you through addiction. Stay Strong, you can make it through this bump in the road. <3

Comments for You have to go through the worst before you get to the best.

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Good start, keep it up!


by: Debbie Wicker


Dear Felicia,

Thanks for telling your story, hopefully it will help some else avoid drug abuse. You seem to be a very strong and mature person and certainly are on the right track to get your life back.

I know it is VERY hard to stay sober right now but it will get easier. Having others walk through this with you is so critical so stay with that group as long as you can.

You may also want to look for a church in your area that has a teen addiction support program, often church youth groups a good place to find new friends and to connect with God.

Keep up the good work,

Debbie <3


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Will my husband ever love me more than than his addiction?


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Will my husband ever love me more than than his addiction?

by Jessica

(Ball, Louisiana)

I have been with my husband for 5 years married for 2 this March. A year after dating I found out that he had started using meth again, yes again he had told me that he had had a drug problem before but had been clean for almost 2 years, so it was a shock to find out that he was using again.

I felt so hurt I threatened to kick him out but he begged and cried and promised he would stop. And he would stop….. for very short periods of time. Then the fights started.

I have been accused of everything you can think of from cheating to lying or that I’m the one on drugs, none are which are true. I have left so many times but I always go back because I do love him with all my heart and I don’t ever want to give up hope for him and our marriage. But at the same time I don’t know what else to do because not only am I dealing with his addiction he has become abusive at times both physically and mentally.

My life feels like a crazy dream I am so saddened by his addiction it has taken everything from him. He is such a good person and will always go out of his way to help anyone but he treats me like a doormat,and even though I’m married I feel so alone!!!!!

I feel like I get his left overs when it comes to spending time with me because now he is using so much he is up for days at a time until he finally crashes or when he doesn’t use during the week he comes strait in from work and passes out until I wake him up to eat and he gets up eats and takes a bath and crashes again, but to be perfectly honest it’s better than him being high starting fights with me and staying outside reorganizing his tools or what ever else he finds more important than going to bed with his wife that’s the only time I can really sleep.

I miss the man I fell in love with:(:(:(. As of right now I have left my husband with hopes that he will get help.

Comments for Will my husband ever love me more than than his addiction?

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Meth addiction often changes people and causes severe mental health issues.


by: Debbie Wicker


Dear Jessica,

The short answer is yes it is possible that once your husband stops using meth and fully recovers from him addiction he will be able to love you more than his addiction. But not right now.

Meth addiction attacks the brain and often causes very disturbing psychological issues. Meth can cause psychosis and you need to protect yourself from your husband until he stops using.

I would highly recommend that you start attending Al-anon meetings in your area at least three times a week. At Al-anon you should get the support you need to not only help yourself but also to help your husband.

Addiction is a progressive disease and if left untreated is often fatal. So you must go to Al-anon and try everything possible to get your husband the addiction treatment he needs.

Ask the people at Al-anon where to take your husband for treatment. The amount you describe that he’s using is VERY dangerous for him so you must try to intervene on his behalf if you can.

Often treatment centers have interventionists that can help you convince him to go into treatment. As a last resort you can also call the police and have him put in jail where he can’t use. Hopefully, once he’s clean he’ll realize that you saved his life and return to the person you married.

Good Luck,

Debbie


Re: addicted husband


by: Anonymous


Having had to watch my brother who was addicted to pain killers for over 28 years, and having lost him to an overdose on 1/13/2015, only a few days ago, I can tell you that an addict is a master at diverting any attention or confrontation regarding their abuse of drugs to whoever is standing in front of them. It is always someone else’s fault.

I don’t know how old you are, but if you are at the beginning of your husband’s addition perhaps a treatment program can aid.

If he refuses to get help, as hard as it might be, you should leave. Had my sister-in-law left my brother years ago, he might have been shocked into ending his addition. Instead she stayed because she loved him, but my brother chose his drugs over love for her, love for his three daughters, love for his grandchildren, love for a career he loved, and love for anything and everything he once had in his life.

For 28 years every member of my family has gone through hell with sometimes weekly overdoses and the constant fear of his death. He has died and I comfort myself that he is finally at peace. I wish you luck, but if I can help someone not have to suffer what my family suffered, then my brother’s death will mean something. Much Love!


So confused!!!! Am i doing the right thing by staying gone?


by: Jessica


Just a little up date to my situation. well I have been gone for a few days shy of a month and it is killing me!!! I broke down and went and saw him last Wednesday and I have been trying to keep myself available so he can feel he has someone to talk to.

I think he is thinking irrationally he is still saying that when I leave that its not helping our marriage I can’t get him to understand the reason I left is because of his addiction and what it has turned him into.

I honestly think he has developed mental illness problems due to his drug use and that scares me because he talks really crazy stuff, he is so angry. I just don’t know what to do anymore he has said he has nothing to live for or get sober for because I’m gone and that scares me.

I called 911 the other night because he was so depressed screaming and cussing the whole world and GOD saying that he was going to kill himself. I don’t think I could live with myself if he did, I love my husband with all my heart I just want him to get sober!!


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You Have To Go Thud!


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You Have To Go Thud!

by Ned Wicker

I was always told there are two ways to do anything—the easy way and the hard way. It seems in so many cases a person chooses the hard way. It’s not for lack of intelligence, or the inability to reason, but all to often it just gets down to stubborn pride. I am going to do this my way and no other way. But sometimes the hard way is the better choice.

Why can’t they say NO to drinking?

Addict/alcoholics have this struggle more than most people, but don’t think any of us are exempt, but with substance use disorders it’s a complicated issue of not doing the right thing because you can’t. Joe Herzanek’s book “Why Don’t They Just Quit?” spends countless pages explaining why an addict/alcoholic can’t just say no.

Once the disease takes hold, the addicted person is in for a long, difficult ride and it’s no longer a matter of quitting, no longer a will power issue and no longer something the person has any control over. The problem may be obvious, but that doesn’t matter. The disease takes the addict/alcoholic by the throat and shakes it like a wild dog on a feeding frenzy. The easy thing to do would be quit. The easy thing to do would be admit you have a problem. The easy thing to do would be to let somebody help you.

A lot of excuses for drinking too much

People will laugh about their friend being the life of the party when they’re drunk, or funny and creative when they’re high, or they will make some kind of an excuse as to why the situation is not as dire as it really is. The addict/alcoholic likes the support, because they can justify a lack of action, avoid personal responsibility and continue to partake in their drug of choice.

It’s much harder to go to your friend, confront them and tell them that they have a problem. It’s messy and we don’t like mess. After all, it’s their problem, isn’t it? You can see that taking the best road isn’t easy at all. Worse yet, when we enable the addict/alcoholic, we lend our approval to the behavior.

A man I know still lives at home with his aged parents, free of living expenses, free to drink. Mom and dad were scared still that they would lose him if they put their foot down. They are loving him to death. They did tell him that he has to leave the house, mainly because the father is nearing the end of his life and they’d like to get everything in order.

Dad told him the major advantage to moving out was that he could then drink at home and wouldn’t have to go out to bars and spend a lot of money. He also wouldn’t have to drive and put other people’s lives in jeopardy. He agreed to move because he’d still get to drink.

Leave me ALONE!

Even though people have the disease, they don’t necessarily want treatment, mainly because they deny they have an issue. They, after all, can quit anytime they want. No problem. They can handle it and they are quick to share that, even though they cannot demonstrate any ability to do so. Human pride is very powerful.

As the disease progresses, they may lose their job, lose their family, lose their possessions, but they STILL don’t have a problem. If you bring it up, you’re wrong and you’re the bad guy, so we tend to look the other way. The disease takes over and robs them of the ability to choose.

That first step states that “our lives had become unmanageable.” Lacking the ability to make a life and death decision is out of control, but sadly, as a hospital chaplain, I have seem people literally drink themselves to death, or continue to take their drug of choice to the point where serious medical issues befall them and there is little the medical professionals can do in the emergency room.

A TRUE tragedy

Denial is so tragic. Not getting help means the addict/alcoholic risks taking that long journey from which there is no return unless there is a major event, an intervention, a medical emergency, anything that will force the person into treatment.

With nothing to prevent them from using, the disease makes the decisions and the decision is always to keep using. Some are lucky. They have people that love them and keep after them. They realize that there is the possibility that they have a problem and they submit to treatment.

Some must hit bottom

You’ve heard it said that people have to “go thud” or hit bottom before they can climb out of the hole. I suppose this has an element of truth, but if you look at addiction as a mental disorder, why would you give the person with the mental disorder the option of accepting treatment or continuing to do what they want to do? The law says people have rights and can refuse medical treatment.

But as a chaplain if I determine that a patient may do harm to another person or to themselves, I have an obligation to report it. The law is vague, wishy-washy and just because a person can assert their rights doesn’t mean it’s a good idea. I do believe that I am my brother’s keeper when I am placed in a position of action, or influence.

Playing with fire

You have to go thud is dangerous because thud doesn’t come until the disease has progressed well past problem stage. The hard way is to force the issue. The easy way is to ignore it. The hard way is to advocate for the addict/alcoholic, set boundaries and organize a plan to get them into treatment by whatever means necessary. The easy way is to wait for them to go thud.

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and Finally Remember:

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– Matthew 7:7-8











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Without Shame


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Without Shame

by Erin

(New England)

Without Shame – Revised

Written: February 2014

Slight Revision: June 2014

**Update at the end**

Link to Blog Post: http://lifesjourneybyerin.blogspot.com/2014/06/without-shame-revised.html

I remember a time when my medical chart said “Percocet Intolerance” in bold, right where they mark your allergies. Something changed over the years, I no longer had an intolerance to Percocet – I had an intolerance to life without it.

I’ve seen your comments and I’ve heard your conversations so you can read this with anger, with love, with fear or with ignorance.. you can read this with an open mind or you can choose to close your eyes and thus your mind but I write this with no shame as my addiction is part of who I am.

I had two genuine medical conditions that led to prescription pain medication when I was in my mid 20’s. I had heard of people who enjoyed taking these same pills for fun but I couldn’t see what the fuss was all about. One day though, something changed, why, I don’t know but it did. This time when I took my Vicodin I felt not only like the pain went away, but I was on top of the world. I had this amazing energy and my apartment was spotless that afternoon, everyone I encountered was greeted with a cheerful ‘hello, how ya doing?’ It was the greatest high I could ever describe, all of life’s worries were gone and .. my doctor gave it to me so it was completely legal.

Over the next several weeks I was able to take just one pill and feel the same thing every day. I got my refill and life was pretty damn good.
The day finally came that one pill no longer gave me that warm & fuzzy feeling, so I took two and everything was back.

I didn’t see that while I was not only killing my physical and my emotional pain, I was also forming a habit that would be much harder to lose than it was to find.

I remember the moment I realized that I was addicted to pain killers. I had an anxiety attack one afternoon because I looked into my bottle and found I only had three pills left. Once I was able to find more, the anxiety was gone. I have lived with anxiety from the time I was a child, no medication or therapy has ever helped and I was taken aback by this, unwilling to face more anxiety.

I went on for 2 more years addicted to opiates. I did a lot I’m not proud of, but I always took care of my son. A day came when I had no money, no pills, and I was about to start withdrawing. I was offered suboxone aka: bupe, which is what doctors use in treatment for opiate addicts to help them to prevent cravings, and keep patients stable while in treatment- It’s similar to methadone, only for a different purpose.

I took one tiny piece of it, about the size of a pen tip, and I was ill for hours, sadly though I tried it again, and again, and again. Eventually I was taking suboxone exclusively. It was cheaper than buying Vicodin or Percocet if I couldn’t get a script, and one pill lasted me a week or more.

By now I had lost my apartment, my car had been repossessed, and I had moved back to where I grew up in small town, Vermont. For that first year I worked less than part time at the only place I could find a job within walking distance, I was on welfare because of my hours so I had to do community service in order to receive my grant, and my son went to the daycare owned by the wicked witch, I wouldn’t realize this until later though.

When I hear about drug testing for welfare recipients I only see the inside of the apartment my son and I shared at that time. I think about what I would have done if my choice would have been to be drug tested or lose what little money I did get. If it wasn’t so intimidating, and a promise for help was offered for those who have a problem with addiction, I would be less against it but in my shoes at that time as scared as I was to lose my son anyway and with no offer for resources or support I think I would have had to forfeit my benefits. Think of all the other kids out there who won’t have a choice in this matter. It just doesn’t make sense. Offering to help does.

After I moved twice more, and finally got a car through the welfare program, life started looking up. I was working full time but I still couldn’t escape my addiction. I tried and failed countless times. I was what they call a “functioning addict” able to carry on about life with this secret, as long as I had my medication.

So many times I wanted to ask for help but I was so scared of losing my son. What if I asked for help and they took him away? What if I didn’t and somehow someone caught on and they took him away? How could I do this to him? It wasn’t fair to him.

I finally got a job where I was working with people who came from many different circumstances. I met a few mothers who told me about their addictions, and they told me with such courage and I felt like such a fraud. Here I was supposed to be helping them, while I couldn’t even help myself.

I went to my doctor, she informed me that I would have to go to an inpatient rehab center before she could treat me. I was so discouraged. I finally reached out only to learn that I couldn’t even do what they asked. How could I go to rehab? I’m a single mother, and I had just started a new job. I was on a wait list to join a group session, but when they called me I had to turn them down as it was conflict of interest due to the fact that some of my clients were in these groups. Discouraged once again, my chance for treatment finally came and I had to turn it down.

I asked my doctor again a few days later only to be told the same thing; inpatient. Finally I told our head start provider. She gave me the names of a couple counselors, I called one and from there my treatment began.

I’ve been in treatment for over 3 years now. If I had the opportunity to detox when treatment began, I would have. It has not been easy, but worth it to get back to being myself.

Addiction can happen to anyone.. your pizza guy, your accountant, your mailman, your social worker, your favorite politician, even the cop who pulled you over last week. Addiction isn’t particular to anyone no matter their race, gender, social class.. or anything else (despite the contrary).

Once it enters you, it completely takes over. Addiction kidnaps you from your loved ones, steals your money, your body, your mind, and if you’re not careful it will steal your life away in the most literal way. My addiction has caused me a lot of pain, but nothing I can’t overcome.

I don’t blame my addiction on anything in particular, except that if I hadn’t had access to the pills in the first place the chances of my coming to rely on them to take away my pain (in both a physical and emotional way) would have been much less.

The big question right now it seems is: why here, why now? Well, my situation like so many others had much to do with dental issues. If Medicaid offered a higher dental amount per year, I would have been able to get root canals instead of extractions therefore not needed all the bottles of Vicodin for pain for both the cause and then the recovery. VHAP offered no dental at all, just saying.

Taking something that enhances your state of mind feels necessary once you experience it once and live in a typically sad state of mind. To feel happy like that in such a short amount of time is indescribable.

I don’t claim to have the answers, I just know what happened to me. When I was an addict I had a long list of people on speed dial who I could ask for these meds, therefore the problem is not a small one but we know that already.

I am not ashamed of what happened to me, though I am ashamed of some of the things I did during that time. I can’t go back and change that but each day I know that I can be a little bit stronger than the day before, and learn from the mistakes of my past. I am who I am because of my experiences.

If you are keeping the secret of addiction, know this – if there is not one person who you can go to in this world because you are scared, come to me. Even if you aren’t sure at first know that I have been there and I can at least help you find resources to help you, I can be a shoulder, or I can just be someone who can relate. Don’t hold it inside though. It was such a relief to finally get it out, and I believe that writing this, even with all the time that has passed is helpful to me because I don’t have to hide this from anyone. It’s not something to be embarrassed about no matter what anyone else thinks.

Thanks for hearing me.

June 2014 / Update:
I am preparing to finally enter inpatient rehab in the coming weeks. Four years ago this month I began treatment for this disease, yet still I rely on this crap every damn day to keep me ‘normal’ .. keep me sane, free of pain.

I will write an updated post later on, but know that I’m looking forward to meeting the real version of my ‘normal’ on the other end of the bridge.
Be well~

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Young drug addict


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Young drug addict

Hello all,

Currently, I am a 20 year old college student. My boyfriend (almost 21) of over 2 years is struggling with an awful addiction, and I would really appreciate some advice.

When I met my boyfriend, he was an oxycontin addict 2 years prior to our dating. He has a profound attraction to nasal insufflation. He has now stopped oxycontin, however; this is because he takes suboxone to minimize his withdrawal symptoms. He is still currently taking it.

Luckily, we have quite an open relationship; thus he is very open to discussing his addiction. During high school, he had a drug counselor but treated the situation satirically. Since I did not go to the same high school as him until the last half of senior year, I knew this because he informed me about this a while back.

Recently, it has taken an unfortunate toll on our relationship and we fight constantly. He has now developed an alcohol addiction, cocaine addiction, Adderral addiction (has been persistent for longer), and suboxone addiction.

He smokes his suboxone at times, and nasally insufflates cocaine daily. He has also recently started selling it to keep his ‘drug finances’ free. I have actively been talking with his family–more so his mother.

He is also very open to them about his addiction. She is also very deeply concerned and at a loss for what to do. He refuses drug treatment in rehab mainly because he is fearful of withdrawals and of course the physical and emotional dependence he has with them.

I am glad that he is able to confront these fears to me and I would love to keep it this way, but I fear that by hearing him out he will take advantage of my understanding to think I am giving him a green light to continue his addiction. He has also gotten hasty with his words–telling his mother that without suboxone he will go out and purchase drugs whether whoever likes it or not. He has also told this to me too.

His friends are also no help at all, rather, they ALL enable each other. His friends also believe I am psychotic for yelling at him for his drug addiction which I know very well is the wrong way to communicate.

I am trying very hard to change my temper, but for all of you like me, you would know it is definitely not an easy fix. His friends also speak of me as a controlling girlfriend, often putting ideas in his mind that most college girls who have boyfriends at different schools are unfaithful…thus creating more problems to avoid talking about recovery. Cheating by the way, is completely against my book of morals and I am not the typical “college partier”.

Although I try very hard to ignore their comments, I try to remind myself that the origin of all this bickering is from the deep concern, love and care I have for him, not to mention his family also.

I cry myself to sleep often while praying to God to help a wholehearted man to succeed his great potential, sober. It hurts me greatly to watch him do this, and at times I am unable to perform any tasks because I am so emotionally numb.

Today, I received a text from his mother saying that his father tried waking him up by knocking on his door and window loudly. He would not wake up..so in fear of possible unconsciousness his door was broken down and was violently shaken awake, and even then he was very very lethargic (he had also been up for 2 days straight).

I feel awful and at a loss for what to do on my half. I have a terrible temper problem and I fear that the words I choose to say are at times harsh and unreasonable. I would like to learn how to speak to him in the right way, because I know that often when addicts are yelled at/lectured they resort to coping distress with more substances.

He goes days without sleeping, drinks for incredibly long periods of times, and does these drugs in front of me. I constantly remind him that I will not be an enabler, but then I remind myself that I am if continue the relationship.

I am hesitant at looking for someone to talk to, mainly because most everyone jumps to the conclusion of just leaving him behind and judging him solely by his addiction. I cannot do that as much as I would love to do that, I kindly ask that if any advice is given, that you spare me the heartache of hearing what I am told and tell myself daily. Whether I am with or without him, the important thing is that he needs help, not the relationship right now.

I have briefly been researching about detoxification, minimizing withdrawal symptoms, interventions, rehab, etc. I was also curious about attending open NA meetings, but it seems that only NA members are allowed to speak during so.

Is there a phone number, an organization, or someone/someplace else where I can seek for advice?

Please, i would greatly appreciate advice towards helping his recovery. I am also open and would appreciate any personal stories, options, etc.

Thank you.

Comments for Young drug addict

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Family Solution


by: Ned Wicker


I appreciate your desire to hang on to the relationship with your boyfriend, but in order for that to happen you need to understand that he does need to be in treatment.

Regardless of any excuse he gives, no matter his reasoning, he needs professional help. They will, of course, address the withdrawal issues and work with him to make his program as comfortable as possible. I understand the fear, but he also needs to understand that his fear will lead nowhere but to the end of the road.

It’s good that you are talking to his mother and the rest of his family. This is going to be a group project and you all have a role to play in getting him into treatment and into a health recovery program once his treatment has been completed.

Please know that he is going to put up a fight and that he’ll likely refuse over and over, but you need to stay persistent, because his life depends on it.

So far there has been nothing in the way of consequences to his drug use, other than getting into arguments with you. But as his addiction progresses, he’s now selling and soon that will lead to his being arrested and prosecuted. He cannot help himself now. He’s on a path and his power to choose has been taken away.

May I suggest Al-Anon meetings? It’s an organization designed to help people just like you. There are meetings in every community, so if you don’t find one that you are comfortable with, keep trying.

This is a difficult fight you are in and you need emotional support and guidance. Most Americans do not attend church, but many churches have strong drug programs, such as Celebrate Recovery, you would both benefit from such a program.

Get together with his family and have a meeting to plan your strategy. You can call local drug treatment centers and get a sense for what kind of program might work the best.

You can help him through the process and help him get away from the drug culture lifestyle he has been leading. Your relationship can be a strong, driving force in saving him, so be strong and persevere.


Thank you


by: Anonymous


Mr. Wicker,

I really do appreciate you taking your time to respond for me. I will also take upon your suggestions; This will be a long road ahead and any advice is greatly appreciated.

Thank you very much for your resources provided and advice.


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With the 12 steps… it all fits!


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With the 12 steps… it all fits!

by Ned Wicker

(Wisconsin)

Whenever we have discussions about the 12 Step recovery process, we always have a debate about the second and third steps and the spiritual/religious implications connected to them. Step 2 talks of a “Power greater than ourselves,” while Step 3 mentions “God, however we understood him.”

People are always free to draw their own conclusions, and regardless of any particular religious background they come from, or if they have no religious background at all, there is no shortage of opinions concerning the value and effectiveness of including such spiritual/religious factors in recovery.

This is an interesting topic for me, because there are many who steadfastly claim that the spiritual aspect of the 12 Steps is vitally important to their success in navigating the process and coming through the tunnel with hope. Others see no value at all in the spiritual focus, and therefore lean toward medical and behavioral issues to explain or define their disease.

One angry person in every group

There is always one person in the group who sits there, arms folded, just daring me to ask him a question, or challenge his right to have no spiritual beliefs, no religion and no belief in God. I don’t challenge his rights at all, but he will eventually make those an issue. Whatever brings meaning and purpose to a person’s life is more the concern for me, rather than some religious belief. How do people look at the world and their place in it?

In the aftermath of the dreadful shooting in Tucson, there was reporting on the alleged shooter and his nihilistic beliefs. Nihilists believe that there is no objective or moral truth, that traditional values have no basis, and that there is no meaning to life. Its doctrines conclude that it’s better to destroy social organizations because they are beyond repair, so rather than try to bring about better conditions, it’s better to destroy them. I can’t help but see a direct connection between nihilistic thought, atheism and addiction.

Hope is the key!

It centers on hope and the feeling deep down that we can get better and will get better in time. The nihilist and atheist will naturally stumble on Steps 2 and 3, because there is no power greater than them and there is no God. Other than drawing on their own inner strength and resolve, there is no outside force that will help them through the process, or care for them during the difficult times.

They deny their own spirituality and so often do this because they equate spirituality with having a religion. Or they say they are not religious, but they are spiritual and they present a smattering of spiritual beliefs based more on feeling and emotion than on anything else.

The guy with the arms folded and the defiant look, however, sometimes warms up. If he is allowed to make his own definitions, the process begins to make more sense. What is the “power greater than ourselves?” People need to begin by defining this themselves. One of my group members said the relationship she had with one of her children was the driving force behind her recovery. That’s a very nice start.

Love often melts resistance

So often the really defiant group members would warm up as a result of the love they receive from the group itself. The resistance melts away as they accept affirmation and unconditional support from those who suffer just as they do. One of the members of a group several years ago was Jewish.

Interestingly, he was culturally Jewish, but not necessarily spiritually Jewish. He was raised in the tradition, but had no particular Jewish beliefs. He was like so many others, who say they are something, but in practice they are not as they say. Actually, most of our society is in that category. He said he was Jewish, so I approached him as a Jew.

He welcomed the spiritual conversation and I made no attempt to steer him to any particular conclusion, wanting him to discover for himself. He had no religious training, so we were starting from a blank piece of paper. He was interested, so he asked the questions. We searched together for answers. No pressure. Take your time and discover. Over time, he formed a picture of a living and forgiving God, a “power greater than himself,” who would be there to guide and support his recovery. It was his perception.

What should God be like

Sometimes I would ask people to write down what they think God should be like on a 3×5 card and just put that in their pocket. I’d say, “There you go, that’s what God is.” As we walked down the path, I’d ask them to tell me why they believed what they believed. I wanted to know and understand.

I cannot prove the existence of God, nor can I prove the viability of one religion over another. Besides that’s another conversation, but what delights me is that I see evidence of God through the changed lives of recovering addicts. They have walked down the path, they have asked the questions and they have discovered answers that turn them inside out.

I love the guy who folds his arms and dares me to talk to him. I love the person who just doesn’t know, but is open to finding out what is going on. I love the person who earnestly is seeking the truth and looks to God to find it. I love the severely wounded, who bite as I extend my hand to help them, because they need so much.

The 12 Step recovery process offers a wonderfully challenging tour of the human soul, leading to wholeness and self-understanding. It’s when we discover on our own that we are not alone that the process becomes exciting and life-changing. Steps 2 and 3 are the gateway to a new life.

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Younger brother is an IV drug addict?


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Younger brother is an IV drug addict?

by Kristian

My younger brother is addicted to oxy cotton and he’s a iv user. He’s been on drugs for about 12 years he also has seizures either during drug use and while drawing. He has no job and no insurance… He’s 33 years old and his drug use is getting worse by the day and I’m terrified that we’re going to find him dead …

What can I do to get him into rehab against his will?

Comments for Younger brother is an IV drug addict?

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You likely can’t get him to do anything against his will.


by: Debbie Wicker


Dear Kristian,

Your brother has a disease in his brain that is telling him he MUST use. Until he hits bottom he isn’t going to want to quit because his brain convinces him that all he needs is oxy cotton and he will be fine.

The best thing you can do for him is to not enable him is anyway. ANY support of him is supporting his drug use and facilitating him killing himself. Jail or homeless shelters may be great places for him to realize that he needs treatment.

I recommend that you begin going to Al-anon meetings in your area ASAP, today if possible. Al-anon will teach you about your brother’s addiction and will help you to make the difficult decisions necessary to avoid enabling his addiction.

You may also want to consider and intervention once you’re attending Al-anon so you can tell your brother that you love him but HATE his addiction. Get as many people as possible to help with the intervention so he will hear the true cost of his addiction.

Good Luck,

Debbie


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and Finally Remember:

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– Matthew 7:7-8








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Woman Offers Free Opiate Detox Kits


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Woman Offers Free Opiate Detox Kits

If you or someone you love is addicted to drugs please read my story for free Detox Kits.

​I was addicted to Lortabs/ Opiates after I broke my ankle years ago. After years of taking Lortab my doctor suddenly retired. He went in to have knee surgery and did not return. I had no advance notice and had no back up supply of pills and this was a BIG DEAL! Since I had been on them for so many years and never ran out I had no idea what I was fixing to go through...HELL!!!! At the time I was self employed and did not have insurance so rehab was not a choice and I could not miss work for 30 days. I tried to call a pain management center and since I had no insurance they turned me away. So I was pretty much up the creek.

About 24 hours after my last pill....read the rest at www.stopmywithdrawals.com not enough room here sorry.

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